Skip to Content Skip to Navigation
Make your grant funding work as hard as you do

Contact Support

1-877-867-1920 Mon thru Fri 9 am - 5 pm EST

Email Us

Accessibility

Social-Emotional • Diversity, Equity & Inclusion

Supportive Tools for the Conversations AheadSupportive Tools for the Conversations Ahead
Teacher Tested & Approved | Free Shipping Over $39 | 100% Satisfaction GuaranteeTeacher Tested & Approved | Free Shipping Over $39 | 100% Satisfaction Guarantee

To ensure students are getting the most out of their education, in addition to teaching them skills and knowledge that will be needed to have a successful career, they also need to be taught about social and emotional skills and about diversity, equity and inclusion.

A child’s education is not complete if they are only taught how to read, write and do math. While these skills are incredibly important, to ensure they are productive members of society, they need to know how to navigate and function in a world where they will be exposed to ideas, people and cultures that are different from their own.

The Right Tools for Teaching Every Skill

When it comes to teaching kids about social and emotional aspects and diversity, equity and inclusion, there are tools that can help.

If you’re looking for ways to help teach kids about emotions, then giving them the ability to recognize and understand the different types of feelings is beneficial. A lot of kids have no idea how to put what they’re going through into words, but with the right items, you can help them express what they’re feeling.

Self-awareness means a student is in touch with their body and mind. Teaching mindfulness and yoga is a great way to increase their understanding about their thoughts and what their body is going through.

Once they have a better understanding about feelings within themselves, then introducing them to the diversity of the world will broaden their horizons and give them skills and abilities to be more well-rounded individuals.

A World Beyond What They Know

For many kids, their world has been incredibly small. Until they step into the classroom, they may not know anyone outside of their family or neighborhood. This can create uncomfortable feelings that they may not know what to do with.

Letting them know that what they’re going through is normal and that the world is an incredibly big, diverse place will prepare them for life at school and beyond.